General disclosures

General disclosures


 
Ministerial directions

No directions were issued by the Minister for Education and Training in 2021–22 relevant to:

  • the setting or achievement of desired outcomes or operational objectives
  • investment activities
  • financing activities.

 


 
Good governance and compliance with public sector standards and ethical codes

Our commitment to promoting the highest standards of corporate governance, professional conduct and ethical behaviour continued through ensuring our practices complied with relevant obligations, such as Public Sector Standards in Human Resource Management and the Code of conduct requirements in the Western Australian government sector.

In 2021–22, we led several initiatives to help foster a culture of integrity and provide assurance about the governance of the public school system. These included:

  • promoting the Code of Conduct and Standards for the Department
  • continuing work on a Department-wide Integrity Framework, aligned to the Integrity Strategy for WA Public Authorities 2020–2023
  • conducting discipline investigations in accordance with the Public Sector Management Act 1994 (WA) and the Public Sector Commissioner’s Instructions
  • conducting formal reviews of incidents
  • monitoring and responding to trends in business intelligence through the Corporate Executive, chaired by the Director General, which met 12 times
  • re-engaging external members (including the Chair, Mr Colin Murphy PSM) for our independent Audit and Risk Committee, which met 4 times
  • progressing the risk-based internal audit plan, with 8 strategic audits completed
  • leading 8 major reviews of the Department’s policies to better guide practices and achieve outcomes, with an additional 18 minor reviews
  • launching a Fraud and Corruption Control Plan aimed to help staff identify and prevent fraud and corruption across the Department
  • developing a new Conflicts of Interest policy
  • ensuring mandatory Accountable and Ethical Decision Making training was available to all staff
  • enhancing our Working with Children compliance controls in collaboration with the Department of Communities.

In addition to our independent Audit and Risk Committee, there are 2 governance committees that support our Corporate Executive: the Finance and Investment Committee and the People and Services Committee. These 2 committees monitor the Department’s major projects and programs. At 30 June 2022, 45 major projects and 13 programs were underway. During 2021–22, we closed 17 projects and 3 programs. 

We monitored staff records in compliance with the Working with Children (Criminal Record Checking) Act 2004 (WA) and conducted regular compliance reviews of schools and other Department worksites.

In 2021–22, 9 interim negative notices and 13 negative notices were issued to current Department of Education employees by the Department of Communities. Employees issued with an interim negative notice or negative notice are dismissed for repudiation of their employment contract. 

We issued $1,270,397 in reimbursements ($1,351,527 in 2020–21) to staff and volunteers required to renew Working with Children cards as part of their employment.

In 2021–22, our Screening Unit processed 22,025 criminal record checks (21,019 in 2020–21) of prospective employees, volunteers, contractors and tertiary students undertaking practicums in the education and training sectors. The Screening Committee considered 50 cases, with 38 refused clearance as the convictions of these individuals were assessed to be in breach of the Department’s Criminal Convictions Suitability Criteria (26 in 2020–21).

We conducted selection panel training to ensure all our recruitment processes and employment decisions were conducted in accordance with the Public Sector Commissioner’s Instructions: Employment Standard and Filling a Public Sector Vacancy. In 2021–22, 102 staff members attended selection panel training. We conducted a review of the training program to ensure it is in line with new resources published by the Public Sector Commission.

We managed breach of Standard claims as required by the Public Sector Management (Breaches of Public Sector Standards) Regulations 2005 (WA). We completed 36 breach of Standard claims. Of these, no claims were upheld by the Public Sector Commission. We supported staff and improved compliance by reviewing processes and communicating opportunities for practice improvements to staff involved in the process.

 


 
Complaints management process

We are committed to the effective management and resolution of complaints and notifications with a focus on prioritising student wellbeing. Complaints can be made in person, by telephone, in writing or online and may be received by the school, residential college, regional office, central services staff or the Standards and Integrity directorate.

In 2021–22, we formally established the Parent Liaison Office to:

  • provide information, support and advice to parents, carers and members of the school community on the complaint management process and complaint resolution
  • broker specialist advice in assisting with complex matters.

The office liaises with schools, education regional offices, central services staff, parents, carers and members of the school community. In 2021–22, we provided advice and support for 78 complaint processes.

To help parents, carers and community members access and navigate the complaints management process, we developed a suite of resources.

Where complaints and notifications relate to staff conduct, we assess these in accordance with our Complaints and Notifications policy, Staff Conduct and Discipline policy and legislative requirements under the Corruption, Crime and Misconduct Act 2003 (WA).

 


 
Freedom of information

The Freedom of Information Act 1992 (WA) creates a general right of access to documents held by all state and local government agencies. We are required to make available details about the types of documents we hold and assist the public to ensure personal information we hold about them is accurate, complete, up to date and not misleading.

In 2021–22, we updated our application form for the public to request information. The new form makes it clearer to the applicant what information is required and streamlines the process for payment and submission to the Department.

In 2021–22, we dealt with 142 applications for information, of which 98 applications were granted full or partial access and 22 were denied access, 5 were withdrawn and 17 are ongoing.

Details about the freedom of information process are in our Information Statement, available on our website.

 


 
Recordkeeping plans

In 2021–22, 12,574 staff completed the mandatory online recordkeeping awareness training, including 11,806 school staff. The online recordkeeping awareness training is compulsory for all new employees of the Department, and outlines the:

  • recordkeeping obligations of government employees
  • requirements to adhere to our recordkeeping plan.

In addition, 402 staff were trained to use our electronic document records management system (TRIM), including 8 staff as advanced users.

In 2021–22, visits to schools to provide training, advice and support on recordkeeping practices were replaced by webinars and online training due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

We reviewed and revised our online recordkeeping awareness training and intranet content relating to records management compliance.

We continued governing the disposal of school records, surveying schools about storage arrangements and moving school records from offsite storage to centralised storage.

Our recordkeeping plan is currently under review and will be submitted to the State Records Office of Western Australia in late 2022, as per legislative requirements. This review will reflect the current status of recordkeeping compliance across the Department.

 


 
Disability access and inclusion plan outcomes

We continued to implement our Disability Access and Inclusion Plan 2018–2023, which identifies strategies to enhance equitable inclusion of people with disability in our schools, services and employment. It covers outcomes required under the Disability Services Regulations 2004 (WA) and the additional outcome of improving learning outcomes for students with disability. 

In 2021, we:

  • provided professional learning to over 12,300 school leaders, teachers and allied professionals to support students with disability and diverse learning needs 
  • developed 646 resources and 45 captioned videos for students who are deaf, hard of hearing or have vision impairment
  • supported improving our digital accessibility through an external evaluation of our intranet, training for staff, and providing an accessibility and inclusivity section in our new communication style guide
  • provided specialised support for students with specific educational and engagement needs through our Schools of Special Educational Needs.

 


 
Expenditure on advertising and market research

In 2021–22, we incurred expenditure centrally of $2.01 million with media advertising organisations, advertising agencies and market research organisations (refer to Table 6). There was no expenditure with polling and direct mail organisations.

Table 6: Central expenditure on advertising and market research 2021–22

Category and providers Amount ($)
Media advertising organisations
   Carat Australia Media
   Initiative Media
   oOh!media
1,168,489
981,112
161,214
26,163
Advertising agencies(a)
   Ad Capital
   Gatecrasher
   Rare Creativethinking
735,300
35,911
133,033
566,356
Market research organisations
   Advantage Communications and Marketing
   Kantar
   Metrix Consulting
   Thinkfield
106,889
29,415
24,904
47,120
5,450

(a) Provided full range of creative services.
Source: Communications and Media, and Education Business Services

 


 
Unauthorised use of credit cards

During 2021–22, staff reported 573 instances of unauthorised use of corporate credit cards with no cases referred for investigation. Forty‑six of these were reported by central and regional services staff and 527 by school staff. Generally, unauthorised transactions were a result of cards being used in error. If repayment was not received within 5 working days, strategies were employed to recover the amount owing, including reminder notices and cancellation of cards.

The number of instances reported in 2021–22 increased by approximately 14% (69 instances) in comparison to the 2020–21 results (504 instances). For further information, refer to Table 7.

Table 7: Unauthorised use of credit cards 2021–22

Category Amount ($)
Aggregate amount of personal use expenditure for 2021–22 37,031.42
   Aggregate amount of personal use expenditure settled by the due date (payment due within 5 working days) 28,366.59
   Aggregate amount of personal use expenditure settled after the due date (after 5 working days) 8,664.94
   Aggregate amount of personal use expenditure outstanding at 30 June 2022(a) -0.11

(a) All personal credit card use reported in 2021–22 has been settled. The repayments for personal use included rounding of $0.11.
 Source: Education Business Services

 


 
Act of grace payments

During 2021–22, we made act of grace payments amounting to $21,501.71. For further information, refer to Table 8.

Table 8: Act of grace payments made in 2021–22

Purpose Payment date Amount ($)
Payment to creditors for canteen debts September 2021 21,501.71
Total 21,501.71

Source: Education Business Services

 


 
Pricing policies of services provided

We charge for goods and services rendered on a full or partial cost-recovery basis. We determined these fees in accordance with the Department of Treasury’s Costing and pricing government services guidelines.

The School Education Act 1999 (WA) and School Education Regulations 2000 (WA) govern the setting of fees, charges and contributions for students in public schools.

The Education Service Providers (Full Fee Overseas Students) Registration Regulations 1992 (WA) prescribes fees for registration and re-registration of international education service providers in Western Australia.

Fees and charges associated with teacher registration were governed by the Teacher Registration (General) Regulations 2012 (WA) and the Teacher Registration (Accreditation of Initial Teacher Education Programmes) Regulations 2012 (WA). Refer to the Teacher Registration Board of Western Australia’s website for its Schedule of Fees.

The School Curriculum and Standards Authority charged for its regulatory functions relevant to certification, assessment and examinations as prescribed by the School Curriculum and Standards Authority Regulations 2005 (WA).

Fees for residential colleges were prescribed in regulation 14(7) of the School Education (Student Residential Colleges) Regulations 2017 (WA).

 


 
Annual estimates

In the 2022–23 Budget Statements, the estimates for the Department of Education and the School Curriculum and Standards Authority are consolidated within a single Division of the Consolidated Account Expenditure Estimates. The annual estimates representing the budget for the Department of Education excluding the School Curriculum and Standards Authority are in Appendix 5.

 


 
Board and committee remuneration

Members of boards and committees, as defined in Premier’s Circular 2021/18: State Government Boards and Committees, were remunerated as determined by the Minister for Education and Training, on the recommendation of the Public Sector Commissioner. Details of these remunerations are in tables 9 to 13.

Table 9: Teacher Registration Board of Western Australia remuneration 2021–22

Position
Member name
Term of appointment Membership length
(2021–22)
Remuneration
Type Base salary/ sitting fee Actual
(2021–22)
Chair
Margaret Collins 5 years 12 months Annual $23,433 $23,433
Deputy Chair
Ron Dullard 5 years 12 months Meeting $505 $5,555
Member
Casey Bakunowicz 2 years 12 months Meeting $505 $5,555
Nicole Brown 3 years 7 months Meeting $505 $3,535
Emily Donders 2 years 12 months
Kate Offer 3 years 12 months Meeting $505 $5,050
Melanie Sutherland 3 years 4 months
Julie Woodhouse 3 years 12 months
        Total $43,128

Source: Teacher Registration

 

 

Table 10: Non-Government Schools Planning Advisory Panel remuneration 2021–22

Position
Member name
Term of
appointment
Membership length
(2021–22)
Remuneration
Type Base salary/ sitting fee Actual
(2021–22)
Chair
Audrey Jackson

2 years and 11 months

12 months Half/full day $380/580 $1,140
Member
Gavin Agacy 2 years and 11 months 12 months
Leith Brindle 2 years and 11 months 11 months
Anne Coffey 2 years and 11 months 12 months
Natalie Gulberti 2 years and 11 months 12 months
Giselle Lau 3 years 1 month
Lisa Powell 2 years and 11 months 12 months
Morena Stanley 2 years and 11 months 11 months
Llewellyn Woodford 3 years 1 month Half day $250
        Total $1,140

Source: Strategy and Policy

 

 

Table 11: School Curriculum and Standards Authority Board remuneration 2021–22

Position
Member name
Term of
appointment
Membership length
(2021–22)
Remuneration
Type Base salary/ sitting fee Actual
(2021–22)
Chair
Emeritus Professor Patrick Garnett 5 years 6 months Annual $37,380 $18,115
Mrs Pauline White 5 years 6 months Annual $37,380 $19,265
Member
Emeritus Professor David Andrich 2 years 12 months Annual $23,475 $23,475
Associate Professor Lennie Barblett 3 years 6 months Annual $23,475 $11,376
Ms Pauline Coghlan 4 years 12 months Annual $23,475 $23,475
Emeritus Professor Jill Downie 3 years and 8 months 2 months Annual $23,475 $1,715
Dr Lynette Henderson-Yates 3 years 12 months Annual $23,475 $23,475
Ms Lee Musumeci 1 year and 10 months 6 months
Ms Denise O’Meara 3 years and 6 months 12 months Annual $23,475 $23,475
Mrs Pauline White 3 years 6 months Annual $23,475 $11,376
        Total $155,747

Source: School Curriculum and Standards

 

 

Table 12: School Curriculum and Standards Authority: Curriculum and Assessment Committee remuneration 2021–22

Position
Member name
Term of
appointment
Membership length
(2021–22)
Remuneration
Type Base salary/ sitting fee Actual
(2021–22)
Chair
Ms Denise O’Meara 3 years and 6 months 12 months Meeting $550 $2,750
Member
Mr Jeffrey Allan 4 years 12 months Meeting $370 $1,480
Associate Professor Caroline Barratt-Pugh 3 years and 3 months 5 months Meeting $370 $1,480
Ms Elizabeth Blackwell 4 years 12 months
Mr Martin Clery 4 years 12 months
Ms Amanda Connor 4 years 12 months Meeting $370 $1,110
Ms Fiona Forbes 2 years 12 months
Mr Armando Giglia 4 years 12 months
Ms Kya-Louise Graves 4 years 3 months
Ms Jillian Jamieson 2 years 12 months Meeting $370 $740
Ms Rosemary Simpson 4 years 3 months Meeting $370 $0
Ms Kristine Stafford 4 years 12 months Meeting $370 $1,850
Ms Bronwyn Tester 4 years 3 months
Ms Katherine Ward 3 years 2 months
Mr Roderick (Rod) Wood 2 years 12 months Meeting $370 $1,850
        Total $$11,260

Source: School Curriculum and Standards

 

 

Table 13: School Curriculum and Standards Authority: Standards Committee remuneration 2021–22

Position
Member name
Term of
appointment
Membership length
(2021–22)
Remuneration
Type Base salary/ sitting fee Actual
(2021–22)
Chair
Ms Pauline Coghlan 4 years 12 months Meeting $550 $3,300
Member
Ms Jocelyn Cook 4 years 12 months Meeting $370 $2,220
Ms Anne Ford 3 years 12 months Meeting $370 $1,110
Ms Melissa Gillett 2 years 12 months
Associate Professor Stephen Humphry 3 years 12 months Meeting $370 $1,480
        Total $8,110

Source: School Curriculum and Standards